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blacklist nsfn (not safe for night) to avoid extreme horror,i'm lana btw |

no more half measures

qock:

In this smartphone photo released Monday, people run for shelter from a hailstorm in Novosibirsk, Russia, on Saturday by Nikita Dudnik

qock:

In this smartphone photo released Monday, people run for shelter from a hailstorm in Novosibirsk, Russia, on Saturday by Nikita Dudnik

fohk:

Luca Bendandi

After finding out it was Walt who poisoned Brock, Jesse turns a gun on his former lab partner, who wiggles out of the desperate situation by framing Gustavo Fring.One of many examples of Walter lying to, and manipulating Jesse, but there’s more to this scene than just the beginning of the disintegration of their relationship.This stand-off is eerily reminiscent of one of the most famous scenes from Quentin Tarantino’s 1992 film ‘Reservoir Dogs’.A coincidence, you might say, given that Walt, unlike Steve Buscemi here, is unarmed. But what was Buscemi’s character called, again? Mr Pink. And Jesse’s surname? Pinkman.And what character is Harvey Keitel playing? Mr White. Walt’s last name?We’re just putting two and two together here, folks. [x]

After finding out it was Walt who poisoned Brock, Jesse turns a gun on his former lab partner, who wiggles out of the desperate situation by framing Gustavo Fring.
One of many examples of Walter lying to, and manipulating Jesse, but there’s more to this scene than just the beginning of the disintegration of their relationship.
This stand-off is eerily reminiscent of one of the most famous scenes from Quentin Tarantino’s 1992 film ‘Reservoir Dogs’.
A coincidence, you might say, given that Walt, unlike Steve Buscemi here, is unarmed. But what was Buscemi’s character called, again? Mr Pink. And Jesse’s surname? Pinkman.
And what character is Harvey Keitel playing? Mr White. Walt’s last name?
We’re just putting two and two together here, folks. [x]

outsh:

1968_02 - Elisa Ngai by The Cal on Flickr.

iandeleonarts:

"As comprehensive analysis of the institutional mechanisms of museologics, Les statues meurent aussi’s (Statues Also Die, 1953) prime contention is, in effect, that anthropology and ethnology have their Schroedinger’s Cat; that the removal of an object from its spiritual context-in-community, it’s enslavement and caging in the museum and it’s sacrifice to the white deity of Art, cannot but change it’s state. The black cat, once its museum-box is opened, is always found dead. Astoundingly, in what is only his second film, (1) Marker starts with a cogent and prescient discourse, a formulation of race politics before the days of the civil rights movement, before the rise of post-colonial “third world” studies, and well before semiology and cultural studies established themselves as recognised academic disciplines.”

- from Statues Also Die, or Schroedinger’s Black Cat

discussing Statues Die Also/Les Statues Meurent Aussi by Chris Marker and Alain Resnais

tfios was actually pretty good shailene woodley’s acting was perf tho gus wasn’t as convincing

the fangirls freaking out over every single thing kinda ruined it but it was well worth the watch

also willem dafoe playing van houten and them listening to actual swedish rap, which sounded so so silly even for someone that understands what they’re singing, was the peak of awesome

and i liked when they whispered to each other ‘cause they were so choked up on the tears

i like people being in pain i wish i had cried but it was too teenage-movie-fied

3/5 i’d give it

… its too early for this bullshit.
— Me, no matter what time it is (via natashakills)

J.W. Anderson S/S 2015 x Raf Simons S/S 2015